Georgia off my mind

Ticking off both our first new state since January, and a destination I’ve long wanted to visit, the last weekend in October saw us flying south for a few days in Savannah, Georgia.

We set out on Saturday morning to explore, and mostly just wandered around the city enjoying the ambience. Reading Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil while we were there provided insights into the restoration of the historic district (the city essentially functions as one of the characters in the book), and it’s quite wonderful how many beautiful old buildings have been saved and restored, from repurposed cotton warehouses to grand mansions.

Other historic features lend additional charm to the cityscape …

… and we never tired of admiring the peaceful squares, their old trees dripping with Spanish moss.

We also took note of Savannah’s reputation as the “hostess city”, famed for its food and drinks, starting with coffee in a cute French cafe near the water, then a quick pizza for lunch. The evening began with cocktails at the wonderful Artillery bar, followed by a cheeky happy hour stop at the convivial Moor River pub before a fancy and delicious dinner at Alligator Soul.

After all that you wouldn’t have thought we’d be able to eat anything much on Sunday, but we managed to squeeze in some breakfast at the popular Goose Feathers cafe, where Tom kept things local with cheesy grits and a pecan sticky bun.

Suitably fortified, we waddled off to the Prohibition Museum, which advertises itself as America’s only museum dedicated entirely to that era. Whether or not that claim is true I have no idea (although we certainly haven’t come across another in our travels to date), but it was very nicely put together and most informative. I particularly liked the combination of architectural/decorative features (in addition to the mechanic’s shop in the photo below, other rooms were decorated like a speakeasy, a pre-Prohibition-era bar, and so on), with period (or at least period-looking) furniture, and all kinds of portraits, photographs archival material and memorabilia.

Adding to our list of eateries, we enjoyed lunch at the wonderfully-named Sentient Bean cafe, before hopping in a cab and heading out for a stroll around the Bonaventure cemetery. This spectacular site was not at all spooky on a gloriously sunny afternoon, but we could easily imagine how sinister it would feel at a different time of day (or year), with Spanish moss hanging like shrouds above the graves.

We rounded out the day (and our stomachs) with dinner at a popular neighbourhood pub, the Crystal Beer Parlor. Monday morning found us sampling yet another local delicacy at another historic spot – Leopold’s ice cream. This was my two scoops of vegan mocha, and it was completely delicious:

img_4756

Other than eating ice cream, what else is there to do on a beautiful sunny day but take a cruise on a river boat (although sadly not, despite what this view implies, a paddle steamer)?

It ended up being an enjoyable and informative couple of hours cruising past the historic city waterfront, some of the modern docks, and then downriver as far as the old Fort Jackson, where they shot at us with a cannon, to the delight of all involved.

I have to end by recommending our B&B – Casa Amapola. We booked through AirBnN without paying too much attention to the house itself (our original booking fell through just a few weeks before the trip, and we were more concerned with getting a replacement that worked for our dates and budget) but we were lucky enough to find an absolute gem – our room was spotless and comfortable, the house was beautifully decorated, it was within a pleasant 30 minute walk from almost everywhere we wanted to visit, and the owners, Angela and Michael, were delighful.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s